Categories
Visual Theory

Commercial Psychology

Context:

A psychological experiment conducted by the army through Eastman Kodak Company advertisements as explained by Robert Yerkes in 1912. 

Reference:

Yerkes, R. M. et al. (1912) ‘The class experiment in psychology with advertisements as materials’, Journal of Educational Psychology. Warwick & York, 3(1), pp. 1–17. doi: 10.1037/h0072656.

Download:

The Class Experiment in Psychology- Robert Yerkes

Categories
Opinion

Byford: Image Quote

Categories
Journalism

Electroshock Therapy

Description:

A device “for giving general electric treatment for psychological effect, in psycho-neurotic cases” during the war. The electroconvulsive therapy  was first used on a human being in 1938.

Licence:

Bergonic Chair by Otis Historical Archives National Museum of Health and Medicine under  CC BY 2.0.

Categories
Opinion

Carlen: Image Quote

Categories
Visual Theory

Emotion Processing Network


Figure:
Schematic diagram showing primary structures and connections within the emotion processing network.
Reference:
Grimshaw, G.M., 2018. Affective neuroscience: a primer with implications for forensic psychology. Psychology, Crime & Law, 24(3), pp.258–278.

Categories
Journalism

Anthropometric Laboratory


About

Galton’s first Anthropometric Laboratory situated in a corner of the International Health Exhibition in Kensington, London.

1884–1885

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Fact

In 1888, a reporter from the Pall Mall Gazette paid a visit to Galton’s Anthropometric Laboratory in London, where instruments developed by Galton measured the physical and mental characteristics — from keenness of hearing to breathing power — of over 10,000 people. The resulting article, titled “A Morning With the Anthropometric Detectives”, described Galton’s laboratory as a world of “order and precision, and tests of the nicest accuracy”. “Dumb though they are,” Galton told the reporter, “what splendid detectives our instruments might prove”.

The Public Domain Review

History

Sir Francis Galton sets up his laboratory in London in 1884  and begins mental testing, much of which was conducted mainly under the principles of craniometry. Not only did he measure the participant’s skull but also assessed “performance on a range of simple physical tasks, such as tests of eyesight, strength of grip, colour vision, hearing, hand preference, and so on”

(Byford, 2014).

 

Book

The Life Letters and Labours of Francis Galton

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