Categories
Journalism

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Understanding the New Status Quo, Following Governmental Advice, and Interpreting the Numbers

We have heard the advice, but how can we interpret the information? Why follow the lockdown protocols? This article will clarify the coronavirus’ status quo.

UK-specific numbers:

CONFIRMED CASES: 47,806.

PATIENTS DISCHARGED: 135.

PATIENTS WHO DIED: 4,934.

(GOV.UK, 2020b)

What’s the difference between the coronavirus and COVID-19?

The coronavirus is what people catch, and the COVID-19 is the respiratory disease that can develop. A good analogy for understanding the differences between the two terms is HIV and AIDS. Whilst not all people who test positive for HIV develop AIDS, those who do develop it become severely ill. Similarly, not everyone testing positive for the coronavirus develops COVID-19, but those who do develop it are hospitalised and become severely ill. This is why preventing catching the coronavirus is just as important as preventing catching HIV.

What is the likelihood of catching the coronavirus?

As of the date of this writing, and according to Worldometers (2020a), there have been 47,806 confirmed cases in the UK, which has a population of 67,802,457 (Worldometers, 2020b). This means that the total number of hospital admissions per 1 million population is approximately 704, and the number of deaths per 1 million population is 73. Furthermore, Plymouth (the city where I live) had a population of 264,200 as of February (World Population Review, 2020), and as of the date of this writing it has had a total of 102 hospital admissions (GOV.UK, 2020b), out of which 13 (approximately 12.8%) patients have died (O’Leary, 2020); which means that even though there is a low risk of catching the virus, those who do catch it and develop COVID-19 are at high risk of dying.

Why should I stay at home?

Because you do not know whether you are infected or not, and if you are coronavirus positive but you have not developed COVID-19; you could still pass the virus onto other people who might be more vulnerable than you and who might develop COVID-19. Alternatively, you could catch the virus and in the worst case scenario die.

How is staying at home protecting the NHS?

When you prevent catching the coronavirus, you also prevent spreading it around. This means that you are doing everything you can to make sure that the NHS does not become overwhelmed with patients.

What preventive action can be taken?

  • You could self-educate on the topic in order to feel confident that you know what’s going on, and how to survive the crisis.
  • You could stay home in order to prevent becoming a patient, or spreading the virus (creating patients). This means that the NHS will have more supplies to deal with the overwhelming number of cases, and those severely ill will have a higher chance of getting the medical attention and equipment that they need.
  • You could share the information with your friends and family.

What reliable advice is available?

  • The World Health Organization (WHO; 2020a) has a section dedicated to the coronavirus pandemic with all available scientific information.
  • The NHS.UK (2020) has a section also dedicated to the disease.
  • The GOV.UK (2020a) also has a section dedicated to the lockdown in relation to the pandemic.

How is the virus transmitted?

According the World Health Organization (WHO; 2020b) “COVID-19 virus is primarily transmitted between people through respiratory droplets and contact routes […] transmission of the COVID-19 virus can occur by direct contact with infected people and indirect contact with surfaces in the immediate environment or with objects used on the infected person […] Airborne transmission is different from droplet transmission […]can remain in the air for long periods of time and be transmitted to others over distances greater than 1 m”.

References

GOV.UK (2020a) ‘Coronavirus (COVID-19): what you need to do’ [Online]. Available at https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus (Accessed 5 April 2020).

GOV.UK (2020b) ‘Total UK COVID-19 cases’, 4th April [Online]. Available at https://www.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/ae5dda8f86814ae99dde905d2a9070ae (Accessed 5 April 2020).

NHS.UK (2020) ‘Advice for everyone’, 3 April [Online]. Available at https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/ (Accessed 4 April 2020).

O’Leary, M. (2020) ‘Ten coronavirus deaths confirmed in past 24 hours across Devon and Cornwall’, Plymouth Herald, 5 April [Online]. Available at https://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/coronavirus-death-toll-uk-risen-4021937 (Accessed 5 April 2020).

World Health Organization (2020a) ‘Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic’ [Online]. Available at https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019 (Accessed 5 April 2020).

World Health Organization (2020b) ‘Modes of transmission of virus causing COVID-19: implications for IPC precaution recommendations’, 29 March [Online]. Available at https://www.who.int/news-room/commentaries/detail/modes-of-transmission-of-virus-causing-covid-19-implications-for-ipc-precaution-recommendations (Accessed 5 April 2020).

World Population Review (2020) ‘Plymouth population 2020’, 17 February [Online]. Available at https://worldpopulationreview.com/world-cities/plymouth-population/ (Accessed 5 April 2020).

Worldometers (2020a) ‘COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic’, 5 April [Online]. Available at https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/ (Accessed 5 April 2020).

Worldometers (2020b) ‘U.K. Population’, 5 April [Online]. Available at https://www.worldometers.info/world-population/uk-population/ (Accessed 5 April 2020).

Categories
Journalism Opinion Science

Advances in Social Justice Can Only be Achieved Through Research that Challenges the Status Quo

According to the European Institute for Gender Equality (n.d.), psychological violence includes “isolation from others, verbal aggression, threats, intimidation, control, harassment […] insults, humiliation and defamation”. This essay discusses how challenging the status quo is key to advancing global development and peace by extrapolating research conducted by Oates, Edgar and Edgar, and Custance (2012); to recent world events. “Forensic psychologists […] are well placed to challenge inappropriate policies and practices” (Towl and Crighton, 2015, p. 9). 

The idea that  psychology could be used to design better systems is not new (Edgar and Edgar, 2012). Many people choose to ignore the deep side of policy, and instead attend to more superficial aspects, why is that? This type of selective attention is considered to be a form of bias (Seguin, 2016). Research conducted by psychologists in the 1950s and 1960s as explored by Edgar and Edgar (2012), gave light to how difficult it can be for the human mind to attend to several stimuli simultaneously. This might explain why individuals choose to overlook complex signals such as “injustice”, especially since the definition of “justice” is socially constructed (Faulkner, 2015). The meaning people extract from media stories influences the importance they attribute to such events; and this is shaped by their expectations, political memory filters, and cognitive styles (Edgar and Edgar, 2012; Değirmenci and Kaya, 2018).  For instance, although media coverage of Brexit gained full attention from the UK public, it generated confusion at the status quo level; eliciting confounding variables such as division, conscious racial prejudice, and ideologically driven violence (OHCHR, 2018). It can be said that such unpredictable uncertainty hit the nervous system of the UK (Mohdin, 2019; Bailey and Budd, 2019; Ishkanian, 2019), causing interference and overwhelming the collective capacity to process the magnitude of the situation at hand. 

The two-process theories of attention describe: (1) controlled attention as being conscious; and (2) automatic processing as being subconscious (Edgar and Edgar, 2012). Allocating cognitive resources to select what to attend to functions in a similar way to economies, where governments must select and prioritise meaningful aspects that need attending to. For instance,  there are problems that do not make it to the priority list in governmental debates, and what is considered a priority is always at the discretion of the legislature (GOV.UK, n.d.a). It is often the resulting circumstances that speak about whether the allocation of resources was appropriate. Broadbent’s (1958) model as explained by Edgar and Edgar (2012) highlighted how information is absorbed and filtered through the limited capacity channel after the senses discriminate inputs based on the stimuli’s physical properties or meaning; and how the mind can become overwhelmed with too much data. This resembles the information processing system of the state apparatus.  Some stories get magnified by the media, and others become peripherally encoded (Smith et al., 2018). This has been criticised by human rights defenders (Maier, 2019) as it is clear that media content and representation, as well as spoken words have an effect on societal behaviour (Edgar and Edgar, 2012; Kennedy, 2007), and  the audience can either allocate attention to the local media,  the global media, or both (Beck, 2018).  “Words have consequences, and ill words that go unchallenged, are the first step on a continuum towards ill deeds” (Theresa May gives speech on the state of politics, 2019). 

Bandura et al. (1963) cited in Oates (2012) demonstrated through the famous Bobo doll studies how exposure to violence can lead to aggressive behaviours. Several aspects of social learning (observing and copying other people’s behaviour) were explored, among which were: (1) the replication of violent behaviour  (imitative aggression); and (2) the selective replication of specific forms of behaviour (partial imitative responses) (Oates, 2012). In light of such evidence,  more researchers have added that overexposure to media violence also elicits social disinhibition and desensatisation (Oates, 2012; Marris and Thornham, 2000); increasing tolerance towards aggressive conceptual systems, attitudes, and predispositions.  Milgram (1960; 1963; 1965) explored the psychology of destructive obedience in everyday life  and Adorno et al. (1950) explored the role of authoritarian prejudice in society. Almost 70 years later, such retrogressive manifestations are resurfacing and permeating the status quo. 

For example, The Guardian has been reporting the topic of xenophobia in the UK, which has two convergent strands of continuity. On one hand, more people are exhibiting antisemitic attitudes similar to WWII (Mason, 2019), and on the other hand more whistleblowers are handing in evidence to The Equality and Human Rights Commission about such insular attitudes (Stewart and Jacobson, 2019). Moreover, with the proliferation of social media, monitoring online activity (Oates, 2012)  and ideologies (Paul and Dredze, 2017) is easy. Allington (2018, pp. 130-135) posited how a new subculture of antisemitic nationalism is growing through Facebook groups in the UK where comments such as: “Hitler had a valid argument against some Jews” are being disseminated.  This all goes hand in hand with Bandura et al.’s theories of social learning and imitation, which posit that exposure to aggressive or emotionally intense role models does influence the extent to which maladaptive behaviour is replicated (Oates, 2012). A good question to ask is: Are there any current world leaders exhibiting prejudice, and promoting psychological violence through their verbal behaviours? The cycle of enquiry is eternal (Pike, 2017). 

Harlow’s (1960) approach to understanding mother-infant attachment was unethical. He also verbally admitted to hating animals, using them, and feeling nothing towards them as shown by Slater (2004) cited in (Custance, 2012, p. 212). Many baby monkeys were intentionally psychophysiologically tortured for two decades in the laboratory for research purposes (Custance, 2012). Nowadays, this type of profile would be classed as sadistic, psychopathic (Moul et al., 2012; Pemment, 2013) and/or machiavellian (Czibor et al, 2017). Nevertheless, he (Harlow, 1960) found that attachment in rhesus macaques was based on emotional warmth, and proposed that humans bond similarly, ratifying Bowlby’s claims which had been informing UNCRC (1959) policy. These and more ethological findings were extended to human psychology through experiments. Custance (2012), building on Ainsworth’s work illustrated the immediate and long-term distress children experience when separated from their parents. She also heavily criticised Harlow’s methods and attitudes, explaining that subjecting animals to such conditions would now be illegal. Based on the UK’s Animal Welfare Act 2006 (c.45), owners of domesticated animals have a duty of care when it comes to providing a suitable environment and diet for their pets;  ensuring wellbeing and welfare; and providing protection from pain, injury, suffering and disease, especially when it can be prevented  (GOV.UK, n.d.). 

 Harlow experimented on monkeys because psychologically harming humans was illegal in the 1960s (Custance, 2012). Furthermore, It is now recognised that human rights are crucial to the advancement of psychology, and vice versa (Söderström, 2019).  Nonetheless, migrants and asylum seekers in the UK have been facing a psychologically violent (ILPA, 2016) reality; being made susceptible to pain, injury, suffering, disease and long-term mental distress due to legislative measures such as the Immigration Acts 2014 (c.22) and 2016 (c.19). These hostile environment policies were a legal reflection of socio-psychological violence with concomitant schadenfreude, and targeted discrimination (Webber, 2019; Williams, 2019). This was initially designed with the intention of thwarting and precluding asylum seekers’ desire to remain in the jurisdiction through enforced discomfort and destitution (Global Justice Now, 2018). Although the policies have recently been adapted and improved to include free healthcare for all (GOV.UK, 2019), some services are still being (unlawfully) denied to migrants by British individuals (EHRC, 2018): From welfare, to security, and the enjoyment of human rights (Webber, 2019). Therefore, it can be argued that domesticated animals have a better quality of life than asylum seekers; resulting in an environmentally degraded, and disadvantaged subculture (Oyserman, 2017). Consequently, UN Special Rapporteur, Professor Tendayi Achiume rigorously challenged the UK for its incongruency with the Equality Act 2010 (c.15; OHCHR, 2018). 

All of the above studied phenomena can be further extrapolated and triangulated to analyse the recent media scandal from the US which has received global attention (Kabaservice, 2019)  due to border enforcement agents allegedly separating migrant children from their parents, detaining them in slavish conditions at El Paso; whilst also denying them “trauma support […] clean water […] nutritious food”; and engaging in indignities such as forcing women to drink water from toilets (House Hearing Featuring AOC on Child Separation and Detainment, 2019). A congresswoman described the situation as a “manufactured crisis”, and many consider these measures to be “unnecessary” and “callous”.  Parental deprivation for a prolonged period of time can cause great harm (Custance, 2012); and the violation of human rights (UDHR, 1948; ECHR, 1950), and of the rights of the child (UNCRC, 1989) does too. This situation, by definition, is a form of state-sponsored psychological violence. Either challenging or complying with such moral crimes is at the discretion of every person’s free will (Milgram, 1963; 1965) and serves as a reference to understand the impact that policy has on individual lives, and the importance of making informed decisions. 

To summarise, challenging the status quo is crucial to advancing global development (Williams, 2019), and to understanding how current world events impact on individual and social lives. The media and the attention given to it play a crucial role in socio-behavioural dynamics, whilst also shaping personal and collective attitudes. This is why psychology must iteratively scrutinise what is already established to comprehend the consequences that arise out of public policy.

References

Adorno, T.W., Frenkel-Brunswik, E., Levinson, D.J. and Sanford, R.N. (1950) The Authoritarian Personality, New York, Harper.

Ainsworth, M. S. (1979) ‘Infant–mother attachment’, American Psychologist  34(10), pp. 932–937 [Online]. Available at http://libezproxy.open.ac.uk/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=pdh&AN=1980-09337-001&site=ehost-live&scope=site (Accessed 9 May 2019).

Allington, D. (2018) ‘Hitler had a valid argument against some Jews’: Repertoires for the denial of antisemitism in Facebook discussion of a survey of attitudes to Jews and Israel’, Discourse, Context & Media. Elsevier Ltd, 24, pp. 129–136 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_sciversesciencedirect_elsevierS2211-6958(17)30288-X (Accessed 6 July 2018). 

Animal Welfare Act 2006 (c.45) [Online]. Available at http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2006/45/contents (Accessed 15 July 2019).  

Bailey, D. and Budd, L. (2019) ‘Brexit and beyond: a Pandora’s Box?’ Informa UK Limited. Contemporary Social Science, 14(2) pp. 157–173 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/h21g24/44OPN_EPR_DS62240 (Accessed 6 July 2019). 

Beck, M. R. et al. (2018) ‘Attending Globally or Locally: Incidental Learning of Optimal Visual Attention Allocation’, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. American Psychological Association, 44(3), pp. 387–398 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_apa_articles10.1037/xlm0000428 (Accessed 17 July 2019). 

Council of Europe, European Convention on Human Rights, as amended by Protocols Nos. 11 and 14, ECHR, (4 November 1950) [Online]. Available at https://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Convention_ENG.pdf  (Accessed 15 July 2019).  

Custance, D. (2012) ‘Determined to love?’, in Brace, N. and Byford, J. (eds) Investigating Psychology, Oxford, Oxford University Press/Milton Keynes, The Open University, pp. 193-230. 

Czibor et al. (2017) ‘Male and female face of Machiavellianism: Opportunism or anxiety?’, Personality and Individual Differences. Elsevier Ltd, 117, pp. 221–229 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_sciversesciencedirect_elsevierS0191-8869(17)30390-2 (Accessed 11 July 2019). 

Davis, B.A., Laurence, J.A. and Williams, D.R. (2019) ‘Racism and Health: Evidence and Needed Research’, Annual Review of Public Health. Cape town: University of Cape Town,  40(1), pp. 105–125 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_annual_reviews10.1146/annurev-publhealth-040218-043750 (Accessed 29 June 2019).

Değirmenci, N. and Kaya, B. (2018) ‘Politics, Media and Power: Relationships within the Frameworks of Political Memory’, Styles of Communication, University of Bucharest Publishing House, 10(2), pp. 9–27. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_doaj_soai_doaj_org_article_6b33f0987f654e67bfb5ef5521df958a (Accessed 14 July 2019). 

Edgar, H. and Edgar, G. (2012) ‘Paying Attention’, in Brace, N. and Byford, J. (eds) Investigating Psychology, Oxford, Oxford University Press/Milton Keynes, The Open University, pp. 325-359.

Equality Act 2010 (c.15) [Online]. Available at https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/15/contents (Accessed 15 July 2019).  

Equality and Human Rights Commission (2018) Asylum seekers in Britain unable to access healthcare [Online]. Available at https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/our-work/news/asylum-seekers-britain-unable-access-healthcare (Accessed 18 July 2019). 

European Institute for Gender Equality (n.d.) Psychological violence [Online]. Available at https://eige.europa.eu/thesaurus/terms/1334 (Accessed 15 July 2019). 

Faulkner, D. (2015) ‘The Justice System in England and Wales: A Case Study’, in Towl, G.J. and Crighton, D.A., Forensic Psychology, 2nd edn,  Oxford, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pp. 17-31 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_pq_ebook_centralEBC1986937 (Accessed 19 July 2019).  

Global Justice Now (2018) The hostile environment for migrants [Online]. Available at https://www.globaljustice.org.uk/resources/hostile-environment-immigrants (Accessed 18 July 2019). 

Government of the United Kingdom (2019) NHS entitlement: migrant health guide [Online]. Available at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/nhs-entitlements-migrant-health-guide (Accessed 20 July 2019). 

Government of the United Kingdom (n.d.) Animal Welfare [Online]. Available at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/animal-welfare#legislation (Accessed 15 July 2019). 

Government of the United Kingdom (n.d.a) How government works [Online]. Available at https://www.gov.uk/government/how-government-works (Accessed 19 July 2019). 

Harlow, H. (1960) ‘Primary affectional patterns in primates.’, The American journal of orthopsychiatry. Washington D.C., American Psychological Association, 30, pp. 676–684 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo-explore/fulldisplay?docid=TN_scopus2-s2.0-0002661226&context=PC&vid=44OPN_VU1&search_scope=EVERYTHING&tab=default_tab&lang=en_US (Accessed 1 May 2019). 

Harvey, A. (2016). ‘The Immigration Act 2016’, Immigration Law Practitioners’ Association (ILPA) [Online]. Available at https://www.ilpa.org.uk/data/resources/32676/16.11.13-Immigration-Act-2016-seminar-for-Lawworks.pdf (Accessed 15 July 2019). 

House Hearing Featuring AOC on Child Separation and Detainment (2019) Youtube video, added by NowThis News [Online]. Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvCZ8oMOdTs (Accessed 14 July 2019).  

Immigration Act 2014 (c.22) [Online]. Available at http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2014/22/contents/enacted (Accessed 15 July 2019). 

Immigration Act 2016 (c.19) [Online]. Available at http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2016/19/contents/enacted (Accessed 15 July 2019). 

Ishkanian, A. (2019) ‘Social Movements, Brexit and Social Policy’, Social Policy and Society. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 18(1), pp. 147–159 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_proquest2161096825 (Accessed 2 July 2019). 

Kabaservice, G.  (2019) ‘Trump and progressive Democrats want the same thing- and Pelosi is in the way’, The Guardian, 18 July [Online] Available at https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/jul/18/trump-the-squad-aoc-omar-pressley-tlaib-pelosi-democrats  (Accessed 18 July 2019). 

Kennedy, B.M. (2007) ‘THINKING ONTOLOGIES OF THE MIND/BODY RELATIONAL’, in Bell, D. and Kennedy, B.M. (eds), The Cybercultures Reader, 2nd edn, Oxon, Routledge, pp. 777-780. 

Maier, S. R. R. (2019) ‘News coverage of human rights: Investigating determinants of media attention’, Journalism, SAGE Publications Ltd, pp. 3-17 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_scopus2-s2.0-85062681363 (Accessed 17 July 2019). 

Marris, P. and Thornham, S. (2000) ‘SECTION 4 RECEPTION, (I) FROM ‘EFFECTS’ TO ‘USES’ INTRODUCTION, Media Studies: A Reader, 2ns edn, New York, New York University Press, pp. 421-424. 

Mason, R.  (2019) ‘Swastika painted on buildings of Jewish Brexit party candidate’, The Guardian, 8 May [Online] Available at https://www.theguardian.com/news/2019/may/08/swastika-painted-on-building-of-jewish-brexit-party-candidate   (Accessed 13 July 2019). 

Milgram, S. (1960). Sketch for a Study of Obedience’, in  Stanley Milgram Personal Papers, Yale University [Online]. Available at https://search-alexanderstreet-com.libezproxy.open.ac.uk/view/work/bibliographic_entity%7Cbibliographic_details%7C2089469 (Accessed 13 July 2019). 

Milgram, S. (1963). ‘Behavioral Study of Obedience’, in Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, pp. 371-372 [Online]. Available at: https://search.alexanderstreet.com/view/work/bibliographic_entity%7Cdocument%7C2082052 (Accessed 2 April, 2019)

Milgram, S. (1965). ‘Some Conditions of Obedience and Disobedience to Authority’, in Human Relations, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 57-76 [Online]. Available at: https://search-alexanderstreet-com.libezproxy.open.ac.uk/view/work/bibliographic_entity%7Cbibliographic_details%7C2082063#page/1/mode/1/chapter/bibliographic_entity|bibliographic_details|2082063 (Accessed 2 April, 2019)

Mohdin, A. (2019). ‘Ex-M16 chief: UK going through “political nervous breakdown”’, The Guardian, 6 July [Online]. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/jul/06/ex-mi6-chief-uk-going-through-political-nervous-breakdown (Accessed 6 July 2019) 

Moul, C., Killcross, S. and Dadds, M. R. (2012) ‘A Model of Differential Amygdala Activation in Psychopathy’, Psychological Review. AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, 119(4), pp. 789–806 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_wos000309899500006 (Accessed 11 July 2019). 

Oates, J, (2012) ‘Learning from Watching’, in Brace, N. and Byford, J. (eds) Investigating Psychology, Oxford, Oxford University Press/Milton Keynes, The Open University, pp. 103-137. 

Oyserman, D. (2017) ‘Culture Three Ways: Culture and Subcultures Within Countries’, Annual Review of Psychology, 68(1), pp. 435–463 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_annual_reviews10.1146/annurev-psych-122414-033617 (Accessed 30 June 2019). 

Paul, M. J. and Dredze, M. (2017) Social monitoring for public health [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/h21g24/44OPN_ALMA_DS51115216820002316 (Accessed 2 July 2019). 

Pemment, J. (2013) ‘The neurobiology of antisocial personality disorder: The quest for rehabilitation and treatment’, Aggression and Violent Behavior. Elsevier Ltd, 18(1), pp. 79–82 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_sciversesciencedirect_elsevierS1359-1789(12)00112-7 (Accessed 11 July 2019).

Pike, G. (2017) ‘Drawing inferences’ in McAvoy, J. and Brace, N. (eds), Investigating Methods, Milton Keynes, The Open University, pp. 308-346.

Seguin, C. (2016) ‘Cascades of Coverage: Dynamics of Media Attention to Social Movement Organizations’, Social Forces, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 94(3), pp. 997–1020 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_oxford10.1093/sf/sov085 (Accessed 17 July 2019). 

Smith, H.M.J., Ryder H. and Flowe H.D., 2018, ‘Eyewitness Evidence’, in Davies, G.M. and Beech, A.R. (eds), Forensic Psychology: Crime, Justice, Law, Interventions, John Wiley & Sons Ltd, pp. 175-192. 

Söderström, K. et al. (2019) ‘Human Rights Matter to Psychology – Psychology Matters to Human Rights’, European Psychologist, Hogrefe Publishing, 24(2), pp. 99–101 [Online]. Available at https://pmt-eu.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/gvehrt/TN_apa_articles10.1027/1016-9040/a000365 (Accessed 16 July 2019). 

Stewart, H. and Jacobson, S.  (2019) ‘Equality body contacts 100 Labour figures in antisemitism inquiry’, The Guardian, 12 July [Online] Available at https://www.theguardian.com/news/2019/jul/12/jennie-formby-hits-back-tom-watson-in-labour-antisemitism-row-corbyn  (Accessed 13 July 2019). 

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Categories
Journalism

Gravimetrics

International Absolute Gravity Locations

1    Bad Homburg         Germany
2    Bermuda             Great Britain
3    Brasilia (2)        Brazil
4    Churchill           Canada
5    Curitiba            Brazil
6    Edinburgh           Great Britain
7    Esashi              Japan
8    Fortaleza           Brazil
9    Furuogrund          Sweden
10   Honefoss (2)        Norway
11   Hsinchu             Taiwan
12   Katmandu            Nepal
13   Lungtan             Taiwan
14   Metsahovi           Finland
15   Onsala (2)          Sweden
16   Ottawa (2)          Canada
17   Penticton           Canada
18   Sevres              France
19   Stavenger (2)       Norway
20   Taroko              Taiwan
21   Ta Shi              Taiwan
22   Terezina            Brazil
23   Tromso              Norway
24   Trysil (2)          Norway
25   Tsukuba (2)         Japan
26   Wettzel (2)         Germany

NOAA

Categories
Journalism

101: Death of David Rockerfeller, Economics & Poverty

David Rockerfeller, the father of modern economics and consumer society (also known in the underground community as “the king of the New World Order”), expired on Monday 20/03/2017 whilst he slept, aged 101, as a result of congestive heart failure.

There are two sides to every coin, and Mr. Rockerfeller was no exception. When it comes to figures of great power, such as the members of this family; information tends to vary. This article aims to explore the different sides to David Rockerfeller in a neutral way, so the reader can make their own opinion based on facts, rather than hearsay.  

All links can be found in the “references” section.

 

BACKGROUND

He graduated at Harvard in 1936, before going to the London School of Economics, where he properly met John F. Kennedy.  He later returned to the US and received a Ph.D from the University of Chicago. Soon after that, he worked for eighteen months as the secretary to the New York major of the time, on “a dollar a year” public service salary.

He also served in the army during World War II, after which he started his successful career at Chase Bank in 1946 as an assistant manager, until he retired in 1981 as chief executive and chairman. During the time he was alive, he was highly influential, respected by the most powerful authority figures of the world (both, political and religious); and successfully became the oldest billionaire alive.

Mr. Rockerfeller accumulated great wealth from a young age, influenced by his mother, who helped him see what made any business work. He was seen as the guardian of the family’s fortune and he taught his children that wealth brings great responsibilities. [References]

 

YIN – “The Dark Legacy”

Mr. Rockerfeller was a figure of nobility, seen as the unspoken king of the “one world order”. Even though he was publicly involved with the global market, and the social change stemming from such; it is also believed that he had a dark side which he was extremely circumspect about. Anonymous News reports: “he was largely successful in hiding his most significant wrongdoings from public view… lived his entire life in the echelons of U.S. society, becoming symbolic of the elite who often direct public policy to a much greater extent than many realize, albeit often from the shadows”. [References]

In other words, he had much more influence over international politics than he admitted to. Some believe this is a result of his inherited, multi-generational, family power, position, and wealth. He had personal ties with members of the Central Intelligence Agency, and some even claim that he was directly involved with the second world war. The Israelite national press reported in 2010: “Sweden’s Center Party has promised to take action following the discovery that one of its candidates for Parliament [Ove Sviden] blames Jews and US magnate David Rockefeller for the second World War as well as the September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States”. [References]

Moreover, he is blamed for specific dark traits that entered society, the market, and culture in general.During his time as Chase CEO, Rockefeller helped laid the foundation for repressive, racist and fascist regimes around the world, as well as architecture for global inequality”. He was also judged for the trades he attempted to consolidate during the cold war”. [References]

 

YANG – “The Light Legacy”

Rockerfeller was celebrated by many as a passionate art collector, a globalist, and a philanthropist. He was admired by A listers in the celebrity community and by political figures. “Many organizations have been promised vast sums of money upon Rockefeller’s death”. The Family Fund has sponsored many programs, among which are the Marshall Project, Free Press, and Free Speech for People. [References]

David Rockerfeller pledged $100 million to the Museum of Modern Art, $100 million to the Rockerfeller University, and $100 to Harvard. Furthermore, on his 100th birthday, he donated 1000 acres of land. In total, it is estimated that he gave away over two billions during his lifetime.

He is credited with the project that led to world trade center. David Rockefeller wielded power and influence without ever seeking public office. Among his many accomplishments were spurring the project that led to the World Trade Center”. [References]

 

THE LINK BETWEEN THE ECONOMY & POVERTY

When it comes to economy, one controversy stands: the platform of transparency that is expected of leading governments of the world has been tainted by the different crimes committed in the name of the oil industry. David Rockerfeller was a corporate master, and a pioneer. “He is part of a family dynasty whose name is associated with America and has become legend. His grandfather John D Rockefeller who died in 1937 was the founder of Standard Oil and the world’s richest individual.” [References]

First-world governments are worth trillions, and some spend over $500 billion (USD) per year in military alone . One question arises: Why is there poverty in a world where the bodies acting in people’s behalves (authorities, politicians, royalty) are given huge amounts of money from taxation to solve these things? But talking about world poverty… How much is it really needed to end global poverty? The Borgen Magazine reported in 2014: “According to a 1998 United Nations estimate, providing education, water, sanitation, nutrition and basic health care to the entire population of every developing country would cost $40 billion. Adjusted for inflation, the cost to end global poverty would be approximately $58 billion today”. Nevertheless, many believe that by 2017, the price is a lot higher than that. David Rockerfeller left a net worth of $3.3 billion. So he alone could not have eradicated poverty. [References]

Why are private, independent charities known to help more effectively than the people we have chosen as leaders? Questioning the system is essential if we want to truly understand the roots of inequality occurring in consumer society. Forbes stated on the matter: We just don’t count the money that alleviates poverty as actually reducing poverty. That’s it, really: spend vast sums but pretend that it has no effect… $550 billion is indeed spent on the poor so therefore there shouldn’t be any poverty.” [References]

 

FUN FACTS FOR INQUISITIVE MINDS

  • David Rockerfeller actually admitted to the conspiracy of the “One World Order” to being true in his autobiography. Although strangely, this information got heavily censored online and some links can only be viewed through the Web Archive.[References]
  • Wikileaks has 945 documents published in their archives about David Rockerfeller. [References]
  • He refused several political positions that were offered to him during his life, such as the United States Secretary of The Treasury role. [References]
  • His eldest son, David Rockerfeller Jr. is mentioned in the podesta series of Wikileaks. Moreover, Wikipedia is flagging his page as “to be deleted”. [References]

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REFERENCES

  1. [~BBC News: US Billionaire Philanthropist D. Rockerfeller Dies at 101]
  2. [~Anonews: The Real Story of David Rockerfeller]
  3. [~Fox Business: Billionaire Banker, Philanthropist]
  4. [~Anonews: Rockefeller Says Conspiracy About ‘One World Order’ is True]
  5. [~Wikipedia: David Rockerfeller]
  6. [~Rockerfeller Family Fund: Programs]
  7. [~Worlds Truth: The True Legacy of D. Rockerfeller]
  8. [~WKBN 27: Guardian of Rockerfeller Fortune]
  9. [~Wikileaks: Syria Files, “17 May Worldwide Media Report”]
  10. [~Fox News: David Rockerfeller]
  11. [~Cambridge Dictionary: Philanthropist]
  12. [~Oil Change International: The Price of Oil Corruption]
  13. [~Forbes: How Can There be Poverty in the US?]
  14. [~Wikileaks Archives: David Rockerfeller Documents]
  15. [~Web Archive: D.R. Says Conspiracy About ‘One World Order” is True]
  16. [~Borgen Magazine: How Much Money Would End Global Poverty?]
  17. [~Amazon Books: The End of Poverty, by Jeffrey Sachs]
  18. [~Wikiquotes: David Rockerfeller]
  19. [~Infowars: Globalist David Rockerfeller Dead at 101]
  20. [~Wikileaks: Podesta e-mails, “FW: More on the 17th”]